27 3 / 2013

I’m not religious, but I do love a Passover seder. We had a lovely celebratory meal on Monday night, and I’ve got leftovers for DAYS. Today’s breakfast: greek yogurt mixed with charoset (!!! — that shit’s got lots of wine in it, plus walnuts, apples and honey. This delicious version was made by my friend Kim who brought it to the seder), topped with the pomegranate seeds I was going to put in something but never got around to using. Drizzled with honey, etc. It’s like the Jewish version of those healthy-food yogurts with grains and seeds!

I’m not religious, but I do love a Passover seder. We had a lovely celebratory meal on Monday night, and I’ve got leftovers for DAYS. Today’s breakfast: greek yogurt mixed with charoset (!!! — that shit’s got lots of wine in it, plus walnuts, apples and honey. This delicious version was made by my friend Kim who brought it to the seder), topped with the pomegranate seeds I was going to put in something but never got around to using. Drizzled with honey, etc. It’s like the Jewish version of those healthy-food yogurts with grains and seeds!

06 3 / 2013

I need to work on refining the definition of leftovers: Does it have to be a meal that was fully prepared and is now being reheated/reconstituted/incorporated into something else? Or does it count equally when I use up the leftover vegetables and half-eaten ingredients languishing in my refrigerator? Today’s breakfast—thinly sliced potatoes baked into a kind of scalloped pancake, topped with goat cheese and smoked wild cod, spicy mustard and fennel fronds on top—was decidedly in the latter category. A lone potato in the vegetable basket; the last of the package of goat cheese that was from a cauliflower gratin I served at an Oscar party; and excellent smoked cod, half of which went into a seafood chowder I made last week. 

I need to work on refining the definition of leftovers: Does it have to be a meal that was fully prepared and is now being reheated/reconstituted/incorporated into something else? Or does it count equally when I use up the leftover vegetables and half-eaten ingredients languishing in my refrigerator? Today’s breakfast—thinly sliced potatoes baked into a kind of scalloped pancake, topped with goat cheese and smoked wild cod, spicy mustard and fennel fronds on top—was decidedly in the latter category. A lone potato in the vegetable basket; the last of the package of goat cheese that was from a cauliflower gratin I served at an Oscar party; and excellent smoked cod, half of which went into a seafood chowder I made last week. 

07 1 / 2013

My improvised lunch was such a great use of leftovers that I was inspired to revive Yay Leftovers in the new year! These are lamb turnovers, using puff pastry that’s been sitting open in the fridge since New Year’s Eve, and filled with ground lamb sauteed with garlic, sumac, cumin, harissa, toasted pine nuts and pistachios. The lamb was from last night’s dinner, where I attempted a recipe from the new cookbook Jerusalem (it’s the dish on the cover, actually). It is true that you can put anything in a pocket of puff pastry and I’ll eat it, but this version worked particularly well. 

My improvised lunch was such a great use of leftovers that I was inspired to revive Yay Leftovers in the new year! These are lamb turnovers, using puff pastry that’s been sitting open in the fridge since New Year’s Eve, and filled with ground lamb sauteed with garlic, sumac, cumin, harissa, toasted pine nuts and pistachios. The lamb was from last night’s dinner, where I attempted a recipe from the new cookbook Jerusalem (it’s the dish on the cover, actually). It is true that you can put anything in a pocket of puff pastry and I’ll eat it, but this version worked particularly well. 

13 7 / 2012

Sometimes it’s not leftovers per se, but rather food I pilfered from a photo shoot. I assembled a killer gang of Smorgasburg vendors to present food for a New York magazine story, and at the end of the day I was left with microgreens, a container of tobiko and a whole bunch of edible flowers. This is what I made for dinner. Thanks to Hugh of Mighty Quinn’s and Danny from Cemita’s for their contributions to my late dinner. 

Sometimes it’s not leftovers per se, but rather food I pilfered from a photo shoot. I assembled a killer gang of Smorgasburg vendors to present food for a New York magazine story, and at the end of the day I was left with microgreens, a container of tobiko and a whole bunch of edible flowers. This is what I made for dinner. Thanks to Hugh of Mighty Quinn’s and Danny from Cemita’s for their contributions to my late dinner. 

26 6 / 2012

My favorite detail of this leftover ma po tofu from Mission Chinese Food is the layer of hot oil that rose to the top overnight. I expected this place to be insanely spicy, like blow your tongue away—it packed some heat to be sure, but it was primarily from an overdose of Sichuan peppercorns, so your mouth got more tingle than burn.

My favorite detail of this leftover ma po tofu from Mission Chinese Food is the layer of hot oil that rose to the top overnight. I expected this place to be insanely spicy, like blow your tongue away—it packed some heat to be sure, but it was primarily from an overdose of Sichuan peppercorns, so your mouth got more tingle than burn.

24 5 / 2012

Nothing to be done here. No need to modify the chicken larb and fried catfish salad from Chao Thai in Elmhurst, Queens. It’s my new favorite Thai place in NYC, mostly because it smells like how a Thai restaurant should: fishy and funky. The servers are super nice, but know that when you request your food “Thai spicy,” even “medium Thai spicy,” the chilies come on fast and strong. They are not messing around here. Don’t miss the huge and comprehensive Asian supermarket across the street when Chao Thai quotes you an inevitable 30 minute wait. 

Nothing to be done here. No need to modify the chicken larb and fried catfish salad from Chao Thai in Elmhurst, Queens. It’s my new favorite Thai place in NYC, mostly because it smells like how a Thai restaurant should: fishy and funky. The servers are super nice, but know that when you request your food “Thai spicy,” even “medium Thai spicy,” the chilies come on fast and strong. They are not messing around here. Don’t miss the huge and comprehensive Asian supermarket across the street when Chao Thai quotes you an inevitable 30 minute wait. 

16 5 / 2012

There might be no greater score than leftover steak from St. Anselm. This is probably my favorite restaurant in NYC right now—the food is absurdly good across the board (I quite literally dreamt about the spinach gratin last night), and it is great fun to sit at the bar and watch them cook these gigantic 50oz. ribeyes that look like they were butchered from dinosaurs. I turned the extra butcher (hanger) steak from yesterday’s dinner into a sandwich on toasted Blue Ribbon Bakery ciabatta bread, a tiny bit of Hellman’s, done. 

There might be no greater score than leftover steak from St. Anselm. This is probably my favorite restaurant in NYC right now—the food is absurdly good across the board (I quite literally dreamt about the spinach gratin last night), and it is great fun to sit at the bar and watch them cook these gigantic 50oz. ribeyes that look like they were butchered from dinosaurs. I turned the extra butcher (hanger) steak from yesterday’s dinner into a sandwich on toasted Blue Ribbon Bakery ciabatta bread, a tiny bit of Hellman’s, done. 

09 5 / 2012

In a fit of leftovers genius, I took the last piece of my Popeye pie from Co. (from which I picked off all the spinach last night as a midnight snack), toasted it in the toaster oven and topped it with a fried egg. Insanely good.

In a fit of leftovers genius, I took the last piece of my Popeye pie from Co. (from which I picked off all the spinach last night as a midnight snack), toasted it in the toaster oven and topped it with a fried egg. Insanely good.

27 3 / 2012

Sunday’s lunch was Saturday night’s dinner, a buttery pasta dish from Porsena with spring onions, baby potatoes and a cute kind of pasta that my friend said looked like small, rolled-up condoms (it’s true, they kind of do, ha). The manager there gave me a great leftovers tip: when reheating a cooked pasta dish the next day, add a tiny bit of water to the pan and cover it for a minute, allowing the pasta to steam. Nice one. 

Sunday’s lunch was Saturday night’s dinner, a buttery pasta dish from Porsena with spring onions, baby potatoes and a cute kind of pasta that my friend said looked like small, rolled-up condoms (it’s true, they kind of do, ha). The manager there gave me a great leftovers tip: when reheating a cooked pasta dish the next day, add a tiny bit of water to the pan and cover it for a minute, allowing the pasta to steam. Nice one. 

07 3 / 2012

This is why I started this blog, to stop throwing away so much food. But I’m not doing a great job—all the food pictured here (prepared dips and salads from Damascus Bakery, ma po tofu and spicy bean noodles from Legend) is now in the trash.

This is why I started this blog, to stop throwing away so much food. But I’m not doing a great job—all the food pictured here (prepared dips and salads from Damascus Bakery, ma po tofu and spicy bean noodles from Legend) is now in the trash.